Endgame: Eurasia

Released on iOS as Endgame:Eurasia, this would have been Endgame:Syria for iPhone/iPad.  We created Endgame:Syria back in the winter of 2012. We wanted to use games as a way of talking about news and current affairs. Our thinking was that if games like Call of Duty, Medal of Honor, Battlefield, Company of Heroes, Commandos, Counter Strike can all talk about war and make references to the real world, then why can’t games also help us to understand it? However the App Store has guidelines about what you can and can’t cover in games and apps. Apple are happy for people to uses books as a medium for controversial topics, just not games.

We tried three times to get the games passed, making changes each time, for example we attempted to remove references to real groups and people:

How Endgame:Syria changed to try and pass the App Store.

But in the end we found that to get the game passed we’d have to remove any reference not only to real world groups and people, but the the country of Syria itself.  So we created Endgame:Eurasia to release the game in a form we could pass onto the App Store:


You can play the original at: bit.ly/endgamesyria.  There is a big list of all the articles that relate to the release of the game and the App Store issue here.  Also there is a longer discussion and links about responses to the game here.

Endgame Eurasia to Syria Conversion Guide

As such we had to substitute the real locations and groups for fictional ones. Here’s a handy cut out-&-keep guide to the original text for the game to help turn it back into a newsgame!

  • Advisors = Army of the Guardians of the Islamic Revolution
  • Aquilonia = Libya
  • Celephaïs = EU
  • Eastasia = Iraq
  • Elysia = Russia
  • Eurasia/Disputed Area = Syria
  • G’harne = Aleppo
  • Kadath = France
  • Lincoln Isle = Britain
  • Lomar = Iran
  • Militants = Mujaheddin or Hezbollah
  • Oceania = Lebanon
  • Opar = Qatar
  • Regime = Bashir’s Government
  • Sarnath = Damascus
  • State Backers = Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine
  • State Militia = Shabiha Militia
  • Tsalal = Turkey
  • Tanah Masa = Saudi Arabia
  • Ulthar = China
  • Unistat = US
  • Zothique = Venezuela

Note: All locations in this are selected at random from existing older and out of copyright sources, so any perceived link between the new location and the original is purely coincidental. Thanks, The GTN Team!


  1. I was, rather, I am very impressed by this game. It’s easy to run through several times for different different endings. The idea of using games as a way to “translate” certain sad modern events is, not necessarially a new idea, you guys certainly made it your own with this game. We are entering a brave new world with devices that not only allow us to tap into a vast knowledge base nearly instantaneously but also allow us access to..well..Us. We are connected to one another from points across the globe, seeing through each other’s eyes..experiencing one another’s joys and sorrows. We are beginning to understand that our perceived differences (language, culture, borders, ideology, ect., ect.,) are less and less important to us as they have been historically as we connect to each other in more fundamental ways: Shared Experiences that underscore our similarities rather than our differences. This “game” is helping us usnderstand one another so that maybe, one day, the problems we see in Syria and in other places across the world, will end forever. To those that created this game….well done and keep up the good work. And..let me borrow a dollar so I can play the game about the cartels ;-)

  2. Ryan Oddey April 21, 2013 Reply

    As a gamer with a political science degree I have to say I think you guys nailed it. There is a simplicity in this (actions have consequences) that are lost on people these days when it comes to the policies our leaders make, perhaps this game can illuminate tha point to some.

    And though I disagree with apples decision to force your hand in removing references to the real world, I think your game has the potential for a longer lifespan and to reach a wider audience as it is no longer tied to a specific regional/global conflict. Looking forward to updates and future projects


  3. Martim Barreto April 2, 2013 Reply

    This game looks really cool But I can’t open it!!! Please please fix this.

  4. Alex stern March 21, 2013 Reply

    Brilliant use of the 1984 Doublethink reference on the in game menu. It seems that the game is taking on a conflict in a more general sense, and on a global, rather than a regional scale. By this, I think it has become even more sociallyrelevant than was originally intended.
    Great work, you are supported.

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